Details » Ravishankar

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- Category: Hobbies
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- Created On: Dec 10, 2010
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User Comments:
1. | Dec 16, 2013
You!!!!(Your so sweet=) I feel so much better now!!! I wasn't fieelng to good, when I wrote this post.=(@Cami: I love you too!!! I miss you so much!!!!@Luna: Thank you so much =) I hopped on over to you Blog and liked what I saw!!! =)
2. | Dec 14, 2013
You can buy some great Earth Sandals at Wal-Mart for about $14. They're soo comfortable. You can also go to eBay and ask to be nfeioitd when Earth Shoes come up for auction. I have several pair purchased on eBay, and never paid over $18 including shipping. I absolutely live in my Earth Shoes, and my feet have never felt better since I discovered them.
3. | Dec 13, 2013
Hi Bernadette,Thanks for the comments. I ssugegt reading the article I wrote on plantar fasciitis (below) and following the exercises as a starting point. Hiring a really good fascial therapist who has a successful history treating PF would be a good idea too. I have had great success in treating PF. In most cases, moving out of the acute pain stage within 3-4 sessions. Once you are out of the pain stage, it is time to focus on flexibility and corrective exercises to strengthen the arches, knees and hips. You will find a few in this article.Now, my guess is that you have been wearing shoes with a significant heel lift for many years. (I consider the heel lift of most running shoes to be significant). The heel lift in shoes places your achilles tendon in a shortened position. It does not get stretched out fully when you walk. This is compounded by heel strike. Over time the achilles and lower leg muscles in your calf become somewhat permanently shortened. This is the primary issue that causes PF and just about every other foot pain issue. The shortened state places strain through the plantar fascia and other structures which eventually become inflamed (for lack of a better term). This is also the reason going barefoot is so painful. When you are barefoot, you are forcing the full natural range of motion of your now shortened ankle which places excess stress on the achilles tendon. Plus the muscles of the lower leg and arches are not strengthened to handle this new ROM. So they get fatigued quickly. The key will be to work through the active pain of PF. Then begin a rehab process that focuses on increasing flexibility and strengthening the ankle and calves. When it comes to walking around barefoot: I would keep the amount of time down. Spend 5-10 minutes a day at first and over the course of weeks slowly add more time. It MUST be PAIN FREE. Start buying shoes with less of a heel wedge. Don't make a drastic move from the higher heels you are currently wearing to a zero drop over night. But eventually you will want a zero drop shoe, if your foot can handle it. This is a process that will take at least a year and possibly two years to fully adapt into. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any more questions. Also, something you didn't mention in the above post. Do you wear orthotics?Jesse James Retherford
4. | Dec 13, 2013
Hi Bernadette,Thanks for the comments. I ssugegt reading the article I wrote on plantar fasciitis (below) and following the exercises as a starting point. Hiring a really good fascial therapist who has a successful history treating PF would be a good idea too. I have had great success in treating PF. In most cases, moving out of the acute pain stage within 3-4 sessions. Once you are out of the pain stage, it is time to focus on flexibility and corrective exercises to strengthen the arches, knees and hips. You will find a few in this article.Now, my guess is that you have been wearing shoes with a significant heel lift for many years. (I consider the heel lift of most running shoes to be significant). The heel lift in shoes places your achilles tendon in a shortened position. It does not get stretched out fully when you walk. This is compounded by heel strike. Over time the achilles and lower leg muscles in your calf become somewhat permanently shortened. This is the primary issue that causes PF and just about every other foot pain issue. The shortened state places strain through the plantar fascia and other structures which eventually become inflamed (for lack of a better term). This is also the reason going barefoot is so painful. When you are barefoot, you are forcing the full natural range of motion of your now shortened ankle which places excess stress on the achilles tendon. Plus the muscles of the lower leg and arches are not strengthened to handle this new ROM. So they get fatigued quickly. The key will be to work through the active pain of PF. Then begin a rehab process that focuses on increasing flexibility and strengthening the ankle and calves. When it comes to walking around barefoot: I would keep the amount of time down. Spend 5-10 minutes a day at first and over the course of weeks slowly add more time. It MUST be PAIN FREE. Start buying shoes with less of a heel wedge. Don't make a drastic move from the higher heels you are currently wearing to a zero drop over night. But eventually you will want a zero drop shoe, if your foot can handle it. This is a process that will take at least a year and possibly two years to fully adapt into. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any more questions. Also, something you didn't mention in the above post. Do you wear orthotics?Jesse James Retherford
5. | Dec 6, 2013
Oh Jesse, I could actually cry I am so happy! I have had this on and off for years. I have alyaws thought it was some form of disk issue and as I am in the RAF reserves I did not want to go to the Dr as it could mean that I would no longer be able to be operational. I really did it last week playing hockey and collapsed on to the pitch unable to move for 20mins. Now I finally know what it was! I feel so happy, I can start to work on it and get it sorted! Thank you so so much!
6. | Dec 4, 2013
Hi Marcia,Thank you for your comments. I have been a posaenrl trainer for over 13 years now. For the first 5-8 years, although my heart was in the right place, I wasn't a very good one. The knowledge and tools which most posaenrl trainers are given is very limited. It is pervasive throughout the industry and is true throughout the health, wellness and fitness industries. We are taught how to train with the same mentality I discussed in this blog. To train to our clients strengths. As a coach, I know the reasons for this quite well. It comes from the fear of losing our clients and business. If we train to our clients weaknesses, they will feel clumsy and weak. Most clients don't want to feel that way. They want to feel strong, but are not educated about what it really takes to actually get strong. When it comes to hiring a posaenrl trainer, massage therapist, doctor, PT, or any other health, wellness professional, I highly encourage my clients to spend the extra time to interview multiple people, ask for references of those who were helped that had similar issues as you, and call them before hiring anyone. If my clients, during my first few years of training, took these kinds of actions, it would have either forced me to become better at my job faster, or I would have ended up in another career. Did you read through the postural series that I wrote? I have several articles up with some basic corrective exercises which will help you get moving in the direction you want.Jesse James Retherford